Tag Archives: social media

Bookish Blogging Events

LGBTMonth001

LGBT Month – April

I’ve been wanting to read more books with LGBT characters for a while and this event is the perfect time for it. There will be a read-a-long, twitter parties, giveaways, and discussion posts. I plan on reading Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe and possibly also Two Boys Kissing, as well as participating in as many of the other activities as I can find time for. Sign-ups are here. Continue reading

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Filed under Blogger Events

Bloggiesta Mini-Challenge: Using Social Media

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Hello all and welcome to the Bloggiesta Social Media mini-challenge! There are many mini-challenges about the details of how to use specific social media sites, but this isn’t one of them. Today, I’d like to focus on the big picture: what kind of content to share on each type of social media and how to use different social media platforms in a complementary way. Basically, this post is for people who start out like me, more uncertain about what to do with these sites than about how to use them. At the end of the post I’ve got a fun giveaway of a $15 gift card to Amazon or TBD, starting at midnight tonight when Bloggiesta officially begins. All you have to do to enter is leave me a comment telling me one thing you’re going to do to improve your social media presence and/or share something you think people should know about using social media. So, here we go!

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Writing on the Wall

17287025Title: Writing on the Wall
Author: Tom Standage
Source: from publisher for review
Rating: ★★★★★
Fun Fact: Facebook alone accounts for one in seven minutes spent online world wide.
Review Summary: This book did an exceptional job bringing historical eras to life while giving insight into our own use of social media and sharing many fun facts.

Writing on the Wall is about all of the ingenious and fascinating ways that information has been transmitted over the centuries. The author is able to draw surprising parallels between ancient media and the social media of today. These comparisons inform discussions of issues still relevant today, such as the question of whether communication at a distance makes us feel more or less connected to other people, and raises the question of how we’ll choose to use social media in the future. Continue reading

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Filed under History, non-fiction