Posts By: DoingDewey

#NonficNov – More Nonfiction Mini-Reviews

November 23, 2017 Uncategorized 0

I have to admit that it’s not completely due to intentional efforts that November has, in fact, been a month of reading nonfiction for me. Today, I’ve got three more nonfiction books to share with you and all of them are books I picked up while library browsing. I’m glad I’m back to picking up books that way, because these were some great finds. Read more »

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Thanksgiving Read-a-thon and A Month of Faves

November 21, 2017 Uncategorized 1

As we start the holiday season, I’m looking forward to celebrating with some great blogging events, including one starting tomorrow!

Thanksgiving Read-a-thon – Nov 22-26

The Thanksgiving Read-a-thon, hosted by Ottavia at Novels and Nonfiction and Jackie at Death by Tsundoku. I think this laid back event will be a great way to share what we’re reading over the holiday break. All you need to do to participate is share your reading with the hashtag #ThanksgivingReadathon. And there’s a delightfully seasonal giveaway you can join at the sign-up post as well.

#AMonthOfFaves – December

A Month of Faves is a celebration of everything that happened in the last year. Our hosts are Tanya at GirlXOXO, Tamara at Travelling with T, and Andi at Estella’s Revenge. Every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday during the event there will be discussion prompts. You can respond to any that appeal to you, making this a nice, relaxed holiday challenge as well. There aren’t any sign-ups but you can check out the discussion prompts here.

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#NonficNov – Nonfiction Favorites

November 20, 2017 Uncategorized 12

This next-to-last week of Nonfiction November has come all too quickly, but I’m excited to begin the week with a new discussion prompt. This week, we’re talking about what qualities make you fall in love with nonfiction. I’ll be your host this week, so you’ll find the link-up where you can share your answer to the prompt at the end of this post.

Nonfiction Favorites: We’ve talked about how you pick nonfiction books in previous years, but this week I’m excited to talk about what makes a book you’ve read one of your favorites. Is the topic pretty much all that matters? Are there particular ways a story can be told or particular writing styles that you love? Do you look for a light, humorous approach or do you prefer a more serious tone? Let us know what qualities make you add a nonfiction book to your list of favorites. Read more »

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#NonficNov Review: Life in Code

November 19, 2017 Uncategorized 1

#NonficNov Review: Life in CodeTitle: Life in Code: A Personal History of Technology
Author: Ellen Ullman
Source: Library
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: five-stars

Summary: I loved both learning about computer history from someone who lived it and hearing Ullman’s thoughts on the role of technology in society.

The sub-title of this book, ‘A Personal History of Technology’ describes the contents perfectly. This is a history of the computer science industry from someone who was part of many of the iconic moments of that history. The essays in this collection cover classic computer history and timeless meditations on the role of technology in our lives. Dates at the beginning of each essay indicating when they were written made them even more meaningful by providing context. Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review and #Giveaway: Artemis

November 17, 2017 Uncategorized 2

#FuturisticFriday Review and #Giveaway: ArtemisTitle: Artemis
Author: Andy Weir
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Summary: This sophomore novel had everything I loved about The Martian – humor; great science-based world building; and an action-packed plot – plus some great relationships and a more complex main character.

“Jazz Bashara is a criminal. Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you’re not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you’ve got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent. Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to commit the perfect crime, with a reward too lucrative to turn down. But pulling off the impossible is just the start of her problems, as she learns that she’s stepped square into a conspiracy for control of Artemis itself—and that now, her only chance at survival lies in a gambit even riskier than the first.” (source) Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review: This Mortal Coil

November 15, 2017 Uncategorized 0

#FuturisticFriday Review: This Mortal CoilTitle: This Mortal Coil (This Mortal Coil #1)
Author: Emily Suvada
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: five-stars

Summary: Less than perfect science didn’t detract from my enjoyment of all aspects of this book, which had fantastic characters, world-building, and plot.

“Catarina Agatta is a hacker….but that’s not what makes her special. In Cat’s world, people [can] recode their DNA, allowing them to change their bodies…And Cat happens to be a gene-hacking genius. That’s no surprise, since Cat’s father is Dr. Lachlan Agatta, a legendary geneticist who may be the last hope for defeating a plague that has brought humanity to the brink of extinction. But during the outbreak, Lachlan was kidnapped by a shadowy organization called Cartaxus…When a Cartaxus soldier, Cole, arrives with news that her father has been killed, Cat’s instincts tell her it’s just another Cartaxus lie. But Cole also brings a message: before Lachlan died, he managed to create a vaccine, and Cole needs Cat’s help to release it and save the human race.” (source) Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review: Counting Backwards

November 14, 2017 Uncategorized 0

#FuturisticFriday Review: Counting BackwardsTitle: Counting Backwards: A Doctor's Notes on Anesthesia
Author: Henry Jay Przybylo
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Summary: The sections on history and philosophy of anesthesiology weren’t my favorite, but the fascinating, moving patient stories were fantastic.

In his career of more thirty years, anesthesiologist Dr. Henry Jay Przybylo has administered anesthesia more than 30,000 times. His patients have included everyone from “newborn babies, screaming toddlers, sullen teenagers, even a gorilla.” (source). As he shares his experiences with these patients, he also explores the nature of consciousness and the history of anesthesiology. Read more »

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#NonficNov – Be The Expert/Ask the Expert/Become the Expert

November 13, 2017 Uncategorized 8

This week for Nonfiction November, we’re revisiting another favorite prompt – Be The Expert/Ask the Expert/Become the Expert – and the link-up will be hosted by Kim at Sophisticated Dorkiness. If you answer the prompt too, don’t forget to link-up on her blog before Friday!

Be The Expert/Ask the Expert/Become the Expert: Three ways to join in this week! You can either share 3 or more books on a single topic that you have read and can recommend (be the expert), you can put the call out for good nonfiction on a specific topic that you have been dying to read (ask the expert), or you can create your own list of books on a topic that you’d like to read (become the expert). Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review: Code Girls

November 10, 2017 Uncategorized 22

#FuturisticFriday Review: Code GirlsTitle: Code Girls: The Untold Story of the American Women Code Breakers Who Helped Win World War II
Author: Liza Mundy
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: five-stars

Summary: A perfect narrative nonfiction blend of personal stories, global events, and a history of code breaking.

“Recruited by the U.S. Army and Navy from small towns and elite colleges, more than ten thousand women served as codebreakers during World War II. While their brothers and boyfriends took up arms, these women moved to Washington and learned the meticulous work of code-breaking. Their efforts shortened the war, saved countless lives, and gave them access to careers previously denied to them. A strict vow of secrecy nearly erased their efforts from history” (source) but here the author is able to share their story based on interviews and recently declassified documents. Read more »

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