Source: from publisher for review

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New Release Review: The Almost Sisters

July 12, 2017 Uncategorized 3

New Release Review: The Almost SistersTitle: The Almost Sisters
Author: Joshilyn Jackson
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: five-stars

Summary: I loved this even more than Joshilyn Jackson’s previous books, for it’s great geek culture and heart-warming but realistic moments.

Leia Birch Briggs has a lot on her plate. Right after finding she’s pregnant after a one night stand at a comic convention, she discovers that her always dependable step-sister has been hiding a crumbling marriage, while her grandmother has been hiding her worsening dementia. “Just when Leia thinks she’s got it all under control, she learns that illness is not the only thing [her grandmother]’s been hiding. Tucked in the attic is a dangerous secret with roots that reach all the way back to the Civil War. Its exposure threatens the family’s freedom and future, and it will change everything about how Leia sees herself and her sister, her son and his missing father, and the world she thinks she knows.” (source) Read more »

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Review: Why Time Flies

June 24, 2017 Uncategorized 3

Review: Why Time FliesTitle: Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation
Author: Alan Burdick
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: I learned some fun facts and mostly enjoyed reading this, but it was not well organized or cohesive.

‘“Time” is the most commonly used noun in the English language; it’s always on our minds and it advances through every living moment. But what is time, exactly? Do children experience it the same way adults do? Why does it seem to slow down when we’re bored and speed by as we get older? How and why does time fly?’ In an attempt to answer this question, author Alan Burdick ‘visits the most accurate clock in the world (which exists only on paper); discovers that “now” actually happened a split-second ago; finds a twenty-fifth hour in the day; lives in the Arctic to lose all sense of time; and, for one fleeting moment in a neuroscientist’s lab, even makes time go backward.’ (source) Read more »

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Review: Touch

June 14, 2017 Uncategorized 2

Review: TouchTitle: Touch
Author: Courtney Maum
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: This didn’t feel very unique, but the career-focused part of the plot was fascinating and the whole thing was thought-provoking.

“Sloane Jacobsen is the most powerful trend forecaster in the world (she was the foreseer of the swipe ), and global fashion, lifestyle, and tech companies pay to hear her opinions about the future. Her recent forecasts on the family are unwavering: the world is over-populated, and with unemployment, college costs, and food prices all on the rise, having children is an extravagant indulgence.” (source) However, when she predicts that people will rebound from their tech-obsession and want more human interaction, both her employer and her partner get all sexist about things and accuse her of confusing her personal desires with her professional predictions. Read more »

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Review: Cork Dork

April 24, 2017 Uncategorized 9

Review: Cork DorkTitle: Cork Dork: A Wine-Fueled Adventure Among the Obsessive Sommeliers, Big Bottle Hunters, and Rogue Scientists Who Taught Me to Live for Taste
Author: Bianca Bosker
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Summary: Light, funny, and engaging mix of personal experience, history and science in the style of Mary Roach.

When tech reporter Bianca Bosker stumbled across a wine tasting competition, she was blown away by the ability of sommeliers to “after a single sip of wine, identify the grape it was made from, in what year, and where it was produced down to the exact location, within acres.” She was also intrigued by their passion for wine, as well as the passion of the many creators and collectors of wine. To determine what made wine so special to these people, she gave up her job and decided to try to become a sommelier herself. Starting as a ‘cellar rat’, storing and retrieving bottles of wine, she slowly works her way into the wine world. She eventually attends exclusive tasting groups and visits expensive restaurants and dinners for dedicated wine collectors. She also learns about the science of wine tasting and wine creation. This is the story of her experiences and what she learned. Read more »

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New Release Review: Lucidity

February 20, 2017 Uncategorized 0

New Release Review: LucidityTitle: Lucidity: A Thriller
Author: David Carnoy
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

“Twenty years after the unsolved case of Stacey Walker’s disappearance went cold, a Silicon Valley executive hires the retired Menlo Park Police Detective Hank Madden to find her body and track down her missing husband, the prime suspect in her unsolved murder. Four months later, author Candace Epstein is pushed in front of a car near Central Park. Her editor Max Fremmer becomes entangled into the investigation of her attempted murder, though he is adamant that he is uninvolved. As he digs into Candace’s background to clear his own name, Fremmer grows suspicious of his client’s connection to a nefarious institute for lucid dreaming on the Upper East Side and its staff whose stories never seem to add up—all while an unexpected link emerges to Detective Madden’s investigation in California.” (source) Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: Furry Logic

February 2, 2017 Uncategorized 2

#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: Furry LogicTitle: Furry Logic: The Physics of Animal Life
Author: Matin Durrani, Liz Kalaugher
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: Interesting and informative, but it read like a textbook at times.

As I mentioned when talking about Storm in a Teacup, I’d really like to know more about physics than I do. Since I love animals, this book about animal physics seemed like the perfect solution. In this book, the reader will learn that “the way cats and dogs lap up liquids can be explained by the laws of surface tension, how ants navigate is due to polarized light, and why pistol shrimps can generate enough force to destroy aquarium glass using their ”elbows”!” (Source) Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: The Lost City of the Monkey God

January 23, 2017 Uncategorized 6

#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: The Lost City of the Monkey GodTitle: The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story
Author: Douglas Preston
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Amazon|Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Summary: This was a fun adventure story, but a little light on the science and archeology.

A mysterious civilization as wealthy as the Maya has long been rumored to be hidden in the mountainous Mosquitia region of Honduras.  However, it was only with the advent of LIDAR, a sonar-like technology for mapping the jungle floor, that any progress was made in the search. The two sprawling cities revealed by this mapping were incredible discoveries that the author was able to explore on foot, enduring encounters with “torrential rains, quickmud, disease-carrying insects, jaguars, and deadly snakes” (source). This is the story of that expedition. Read more »

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Translated Fiction Review: The Slow Waltz of Turtles

January 5, 2017 Uncategorized 3

Translated Fiction Review: The Slow Waltz of TurtlesTitle: The Slow Waltz of Turtles
Author: Katherine Pancol
Source: from publisher for review
|Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: I enjoyed the writing style and many perspectives, but this was darker than the first book and the character development felt like a repeat.

“Forty-something mother of two Josephine Cortes is at a crossroads. She has just moved to a posh new apartment in Paris after the success of the historical novel she ghostwrote for her sister, Iris. Still struggling with her divorce – the result of her husband running off to Kenya to start a crocodile farm with his mistress – she is now entangled in a lie orchestrated by her sister. And just when things seem as though they can’t get any more complicated, people start turning up dead in her neighbourhood.” (Source) Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: Victoria

November 27, 2016 Uncategorized 0

#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: VictoriaTitle: Victoria
Author: Daisy Goodwin
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Amazon|Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: This was an interesting and well written story, but it was more of a romance than I expected and the writing wasn’t emotionally engaging enough for that.

“In 1837, less than a month after her eighteenth birthday, Alexandrina Victoria – sheltered, small in stature, and female – became Queen of Great Britain and Ireland. Many thought it was preposterous: Alexandrina — Drina to her family — had always been tightly controlled by her mother and her household, and was surely too unprepossessing to hold the throne. Yet from the moment William IV died, the young Queen startled everyone: abandoning her hated first name in favor of Victoria; insisting, for the first time in her life, on sleeping in a room apart from her mother; resolute about meeting with her ministers alone. One of those ministers, Lord Melbourne, became Victoria’s private secretary. Perhaps he might have become more than that, except everyone argued she was destined to marry her cousin, Prince Albert.” (Source) Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: A Warrior of the People

November 11, 2016 Biography, History, non-fiction 4

#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: A Warrior of the PeopleTitle: A Warrior of the People: How Susan La Flesche Overcame Racial and Gender Inequality to Become America’s First Indian Doctor
Author: Joe Starita
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Amazon|Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: An incredible and engaging story, although written a bit simply.

Susan La Flesche was the first Native American to become a doctor, at a time when any female doctors were rare. She overcome many obstacles and made difficult personal sacrifices to serve her people. Her level of community involvement while in school and while serving as a doctor was almost unbelievable. She led a fascinating and inspiring life. Read more »

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