Review: The Last One

April 13, 2017 Uncategorized 4

Review: The Last OneTitle: The Last One
Author: Alexandra Oliva
Source: NetGalley
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: This was a lot of fun and somewhat insightful about reality TV, but overall it was also light and predictable.

I always enjoy a fresh take on disaster/dystopian novels and I’ve been enjoying reality TV lately, so I couldn’t resist this story of a reality show contestant who begins to be uncertain whether a disaster is real or part of the show. While Zoo participates in an endurance  and survival skills challenge, the lines between reality and the show begin to blur. Determining which is which may make the difference to whether or not she survives. Read more »

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TLC Book Tours: Epic Measures

April 10, 2017 Uncategorized 2

TLC Book Tours: Epic MeasuresTitle: Epic Measures: One Doctor. Seven Billion Patients.
Author: Jeremy N. Smith
Source: TLC Book Tours
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Today, the idea of being able to rank countries based on their healthcare and to know the main causes of death around the world seems normal to me. Amazingly, this was nearly impossible a decade ago. Chris Murray was shocked to find that WHO estimates of deaths from different causes added to more than the total of deaths. Many countries didn’t officially track births and deaths and many records reported immediate cause of death but not the ultimate cause of death (head injury, but not that it was from a car crash, for example). Murray’s intensity and expertise equipped him to solve this technical challenge, but his sometimes abrasive personality made the politics of getting his results adopted equally challenging. Read more »

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Women in Science History Wrap-Up

April 3, 2017 Uncategorized 4

The month may have flown by, but it’s been a great month. I really enjoyed the reading I did about women in science history and I loved hearing about the books you read so I could grow my to-read list! Thanks to everyone who joined in. Here’s the link-up one last time. Be sure to add your links and check out what everyone else was reading!

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Nonfiction Book Club Link-Up

March 30, 2017 Uncategorized 2

Wow, these read-alongs really do sneak up on me! It’s time to wrap up our March read and I hope you all found it as enjoyable and informative as I did. I’ve shared my answers to the discussion questions below and added a link-up where you can share your answers as well.
Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review: City of Light, City of Poison

March 28, 2017 Uncategorized 4

#FuturisticFriday Review: City of Light, City of PoisonTitle: City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris
Author: Holly Tucker
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn’t told in a particularly engaging way.

“Appointed to conquer the “crime capital of the world,” the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de La Reynie begins by clearing the streets of filth and installing lanterns throughout Paris, turning it into the City of Light. The fearless La Reynie pursues criminals through the labyrinthine neighborhoods of the city. He unearths a tightly knit cabal of poisoners, witches, and renegade priests. As he exposes their unholy work, he soon learns that no one is safe from black magic—not even the Sun King” (source). Read more »

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Women in Science History Review: Rise of the Rocket Girls

March 27, 2017 Uncategorized 6

Women in Science History Review: Rise of the Rocket GirlsTitle: Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars
Author: Nathalia Holt
Source: Library
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Review: This was a fun read and highlighted some important work, but I would have liked more depth on the technical side of the story.

Long before ‘computers’ were calculating machines, they were mathematicians (primarily women) and eventually the first software developers. Working at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, an elite group of female computers fought hard to balance personal lives with careers they loved at a time when that was still considered a highly unusual thing for a woman to do. Through their expertise and painstaking effort, these computers “transformed rocket design, helped bring about the first American satellites, and made the exploration of the solar system possible” (source). Read more »

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