Posts By: DoingDewey

Nonfiction Book Club Link-Up

March 30, 2017 Uncategorized 2

Wow, these read-alongs really do sneak up on me! It’s time to wrap up our March read and I hope you all found it as enjoyable and informative as I did. I’ve shared my answers to the discussion questions below and added a link-up where you can share your answers as well.
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#FuturisticFriday Review: City of Light, City of Poison

March 28, 2017 Uncategorized 4

#FuturisticFriday Review: City of Light, City of PoisonTitle: City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris
Author: Holly Tucker
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn’t told in a particularly engaging way.

“Appointed to conquer the “crime capital of the world,” the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de La Reynie begins by clearing the streets of filth and installing lanterns throughout Paris, turning it into the City of Light. The fearless La Reynie pursues criminals through the labyrinthine neighborhoods of the city. He unearths a tightly knit cabal of poisoners, witches, and renegade priests. As he exposes their unholy work, he soon learns that no one is safe from black magic—not even the Sun King” (source). Read more »

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Women in Science History Review: Rise of the Rocket Girls

March 27, 2017 Uncategorized 6

Women in Science History Review: Rise of the Rocket GirlsTitle: Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars
Author: Nathalia Holt
Source: Library
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Review: This was a fun read and highlighted some important work, but I would have liked more depth on the technical side of the story.

Long before ‘computers’ were calculating machines, they were mathematicians (primarily women) and eventually the first software developers. Working at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, an elite group of female computers fought hard to balance personal lives with careers they loved at a time when that was still considered a highly unusual thing for a woman to do. Through their expertise and painstaking effort, these computers “transformed rocket design, helped bring about the first American satellites, and made the exploration of the solar system possible” (source). Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review: The Perfect Stranger

March 20, 2017 Uncategorized 7

#FuturisticFriday Review: The Perfect StrangerTitle: The Perfect Stranger
Author: Megan Miranda
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Summary: This suspenseful, well-written, unique and twisty thriller was an awesome read.

With her journalism career in ruins, Leah Stevens is ready to for a fresh start when she runs into her old roommate, Emmy Grey. The two of them quickly agree to move somewhere new to start over together. Shortly after their move, when a women who looks like Leah is attacked and Emmy disappears, Leah realizes she might never have known who Emmy was at all. In fact, she is unable to prove to the police that Emmy even exists and soon becomes a suspect herself. Read more »

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Women in Science History Week 2

March 19, 2017 Uncategorized 4

Time for another link-up! I’m once again looking forward to sharing a great book with you in the coming week – some great posts about a book called The Rise of the Rocket Girls – and am really enjoying the reading I’m doing for this event. I hope you’re all having fun too! So far, BJ at Book-a-logue has gotten us started with Women in Science and I can’t wait to hear what the rest of you have been reading too. If you pick up any books, nonfiction or fiction, about real female scientists, link them up anytime this month. I’ll be posting the next two link-ups on the last two Saturdays of the month.

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Nonfiction Book Club May Poll

March 15, 2017 Uncategorized 11

It feels a bit strange to be doing these polls so much in advance, but it is already time to pick our May nonfiction book club read! Ah, that’s better. Now that I’ve forgotten to post this for a week, this feels more like normal :-p I’ll leave the poll open for a week from today, so I you all still have some time to vote! I’ve carried over The Empathy Exams, since that got lots of votes last time, and I’ve added a few new options too. I can’t wait to see what you all pick!

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#Futuristic Friday Review: Nabokov’s Favorite Word Is Mauve

March 14, 2017 Uncategorized 9

#Futuristic Friday Review: Nabokov’s Favorite Word Is MauveTitle: Nabokov's Favorite Word Is Mauve: What the Numbers Reveal About the Classics, Bestsellers, and Our Own Writing
Author: Ben Blatt
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Summary: This book was wonderfully entertaining with lots of great fun facts, but a little bit light on the statistics.

As book bloggers or avid reads, I suspect most of you reading this post have thought at least a little bit about what qualities make a book one of your favorites. In this book, the author tries to answer that and other intriguing bookish questions objectively using statistics. Questions he addresses include: “What are our favorite authors’ favorite words? Do men and women write differently? Are bestsellers getting dumber over time? Which bestselling writer uses the most clichés? What makes a great opening sentence? How can we judge a book by its cover? And which writerly advice is worth following or ignoring?” (source) Read more »

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