#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: Multiple Choice

July 24, 2016 Uncategorized 1

#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: Multiple ChoiceTitle: Multiple Choice
Author: Alejandro Zambra, Megan McDowell
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Amazon|Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Summary: I’m not entirely certain what to make of this clever and darkly humorous book, but I definitely enjoyed how unique it was.

If you’re like me and actually found standardized tests kind of fun or if you just share my enjoyment of unique book formats, you should definitely check out Multiple Choice. I’ve never read anything like this book, with its test-like format, before. The reading experience reminded me a tiny bit of Brown Girl Dreaming, because in both cases the authors’ packed a lot of meaning into few words. I had to intentionally slow myself down and make myself take the time to absorb the writing. I wasn’t sure this was going to be something I enjoyed at first, but it grew on me.
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Review: The Imperial Wife

July 17, 2016 Fiction, Historical Fiction 3

Review: The Imperial WifeTitle: The Imperial Wife
Author: Irina Reyn
Source: FirstToRead
Links: Amazon|Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: This was a light, fast read with great parallel storylines, but an unsatisfying ending.

“Tanya Kagan, a rising specialist in Russian art at a top New York auction house, is trying to entice Russia’s wealthy oligarchs to bid on the biggest sale of her career, The Order of Saint Catherine, while making sense of the sudden and unexplained departure of her husband.” (source) As we learn more the provenance of the order and its ownership by Catherine the Great, there are clear parallels between the challenges she and Tanya each face. Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: Lost and Found

July 5, 2016 Fiction, Young Adult 1

#FuturisticFriday Review and Giveaway: Lost and FoundTitle: The Lost & Found
Author: Katrina Leno
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Amazon|Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Summary: Although cute, sweet, and quirky, this book managed to tackle some big issues believably and sympathetically.

“Frannie and Louis met in an online support group when they were both younger. They have never met face-to-face. They don’t even know each other’s real names. All they know is that they both have a mysterious tendency to lose things. Well, not lose them, exactly. Things just seem to…disappear. […] They each receive news in the mail that sets them off on a road trip to Austin, Texas, looking for answers—and each other. Along the way, each one begins to find, as if by magic, important things the other has lost.” (Source) During the trip and with each other’s help, they may be able to come to terms with big changes in their lives. Read more »

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June Wrap-Up Post

July 4, 2016 Uncategorized 12

January 2016

Well, it turns out there’s not much that can keep me from reading! It’s been an incredibly crazy month finishing up my thesis, but I’ve still enjoyed picking up some light reads to keep me going. I now actually have my thesis turned in to my committee and I’m looking forward to taking a reading break after I do my defense a week from today.
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3 Awesome Books About Modern Women in Mini-Reviews

July 1, 2016 Uncategorized 16

3 Awesome Books About Modern Women in Mini-ReviewsTitle: The Assistants
Author: Camille Perri
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Amazon|Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: five-stars

Lately, I haven’t had specific review deadlines to guide my reading choices and I find the options a bit overwhelming. I’ve gotten extremely lucky with a lot of the books I’ve picked though! The Assistants was one of several books I’ve read while working on my thesis that was precisely what I needed at the time. It was light and compulsively readable, but also smart and insightful. It had all the fun of a heist movie, but also managed to feel real and relatable. I loved the main character, the sidekicks, and the love interest. I had a serious book hangover afterwards because I couldn’t imagine finding something else that fit my desire for light but smart reading as well as this did. I think everyone in their late twenties will also share my enjoyment of reading a book about a character at this stage in their life. This is a book I want to recommend to everyone, but I think it’s especially perfect if you’re looking for your next not-too-light beach read. Read more »

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Review: First Comes Love

June 28, 2016 Fiction 10

Review: First Comes LoveTitle: First Comes Love
Author: Emily Giffin
Source: FirstToRead
Links: Amazon|Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: two-stars

Summary: Blech. Not great writing and unbelievably dramatic plot.

“Growing up, Josie and Meredith Garland shared a loving, if sometimes contentious relationship. Josie was impulsive, spirited, and outgoing; Meredith hardworking, thoughtful, and reserved. When tragedy strikes their family, their different responses to the event splinter their delicate bond. Fifteen years later, Josie and Meredith are in their late thirties, following very different paths.” (source) Neither are happy with their lives and their jealousy of each other is hard for them to overcome. Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review: All the Missing Girls

June 25, 2016 Uncategorized 12

#FuturisticFriday Review: All the Missing GirlsTitle: All the Missing Girls
Author: Megan Miranda
Source: NetGalley
Links: Amazon|Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: five-stars

Summary: This felt fresh and surprising and kept my heart pounding the whole way through. Loved it!

“It’s been ten years since Nicolette Farrell left her rural hometown after her best friend, Corinne, disappeared from Cooley Ridge without a trace. Back again to tie up loose ends and care for her ailing father, Nic is soon plunged into a shocking drama that reawakens Corinne’s case” (source) when another girl disappears and yet again, it seems possible some of the people closest to Nic might be involved. Read more »

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#FuturisticFriday Review: Face Value

June 21, 2016 non-fiction 10

#FuturisticFriday Review: Face ValueTitle: Face Value: The Hidden Ways Beauty Shapes Women's Lives
Author: Autumn Whitefield-Madrano
Source: NetGalley
Links: Amazon|Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Summary: I really enjoyed this thoughtful, balanced look at both the empowering and enjoyable side of beauty and the negative ways it affects women’s lives.

“In Face Value, journalist Autumn Whitefield-Madrano thoughtfully examines the relationship between appearance and science, social media, sex, friendship, language, and advertising to show how beauty actually affects us day to day. Through meticulous research and interviews with dozens of women across all walks of life, she reveals surprising findings, like that wearing makeup can actually relax you, that you can convince people you’re better looking just by tweaking your personality, and the ways beauty can be a powerful tool of connection among women.” (source) Read more »

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Review: The Nordic Theory of Everything

June 18, 2016 non-fiction 10

Review: The Nordic Theory of EverythingTitle: The Nordic Theory of Everything: In Search of a Better Life
Author: Anu Partanen
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Amazon|Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Summary: A bit repetitive and a mix of uplifting and depressing, but I really enjoyed learning about the government and social structure of other countries.

When Finnish journalist Anu Partanen moved to the United States, she found herself overwhelmed by anxiety. The lack of a social support system, especially public healthcare, and the complexity of everything from taxes to securing a child’s education was shocking compared to the ease and security provided to citizens in Finland. By comparing and contrasting the social services provided in the US and the Nordic countries, she “debunks criticism that Nordic countries are socialist “nanny states,” revealing instead that it is we Americans who are far more enmeshed in unhealthy dependencies than we realize. As Partanen explains step by step, the Nordic approach allows citizens to enjoy more individual freedom and independence than we do.” (source) Read more »

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