Review: Why Time Flies

June 24, 2017 Uncategorized 3

Review: Why Time FliesTitle: Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation
Author: Alan Burdick
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: I learned some fun facts and mostly enjoyed reading this, but it was not well organized or cohesive.

‘“Time” is the most commonly used noun in the English language; it’s always on our minds and it advances through every living moment. But what is time, exactly? Do children experience it the same way adults do? Why does it seem to slow down when we’re bored and speed by as we get older? How and why does time fly?’ In an attempt to answer this question, author Alan Burdick ‘visits the most accurate clock in the world (which exists only on paper); discovers that “now” actually happened a split-second ago; finds a twenty-fifth hour in the day; lives in the Arctic to lose all sense of time; and, for one fleeting moment in a neuroscientist’s lab, even makes time go backward.’ (source) Read more »

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Review: Four Reigns

June 19, 2017 Uncategorized 0

Review: Four ReignsTitle: Four Reigns
Author: Kukrit Pramoj
Source: Bought
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: This was very long and not much happened, but it did provide an interesting glimpse of another culture.

“This English version of the Thai novel Si Phaendin tells the rich and entertaining story of one woman’s life both inside and outside the royal palace in Bangkok. Spanning a period of four reigns, from King Chulalongkorn to the reign of his grandson King Ananda, this popular modern classic gives insight into the social and political issues facing Thailand from the 1890s through the turbulent years of World War II.” (source) Read more »

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Review: Touch

June 14, 2017 Uncategorized 2

Review: TouchTitle: Touch
Author: Courtney Maum
Source: from publisher for review
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: This didn’t feel very unique, but the career-focused part of the plot was fascinating and the whole thing was thought-provoking.

“Sloane Jacobsen is the most powerful trend forecaster in the world (she was the foreseer of the swipe ), and global fashion, lifestyle, and tech companies pay to hear her opinions about the future. Her recent forecasts on the family are unwavering: the world is over-populated, and with unemployment, college costs, and food prices all on the rise, having children is an extravagant indulgence.” (source) However, when she predicts that people will rebound from their tech-obsession and want more human interaction, both her employer and her partner get all sexist about things and accuse her of confusing her personal desires with her professional predictions. Read more »

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Review: The Wanderers

June 12, 2017 Uncategorized 2

Review: The WanderersTitle: The Wanderers
Author: Meg Howrey
Source: Library
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: five-stars

Summary: Beautifully written, character-driven, introspective, and a joy to read.

“In four years Prime Space will put the first humans on Mars. Helen Kane, Yoshi Tanaka, and Sergei Kuznetsov must prove they’re the crew for the job by spending seventeen months in the most realistic simulation every created. Retired from NASA, Helen had not trained for irrelevance. It is nobody’s fault that the best of her exists in space, but her daughter can’t help placing blame. The MarsNOW mission is Helen’s last chance to return to the only place she’s ever truly felt at home. For Yoshi, it’s an opportunity to prove himself worthy of the wife he has loved absolutely, if not quite rightly. Sergei is willing to spend seventeen months in a tin can if it means travelling to Mars. He will at least be tested past the point of exhaustion, and this is the example he will set for his sons.” (source) Read more »

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May Wrap-Up

June 8, 2017 Uncategorized 8

Wow, I think I’ve been in as much of a blogging slump as I’ve ever been lately! I’m not sure if I’m still burnt out for all my science march social media-ing or if I’m just focused on other priorities right now, but blogging has felt more like work to me this past month. I’ve been pretty silent on the blog, but I’m hoping I’ve recovered enough to get back into it in the coming week. I’m thinking about how to better schedule and organize my blogging to it feels easier to keep up with everything, so if you have any tips for that, please share!
Read more »

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Review: War and Peace

May 22, 2017 Uncategorized 10

Review: War and PeaceTitle: War and Peace
Author: Leo Tolstoy, Henry Gifford, Aylmer Maude, Louise Maude
|Goodreads
Rating: three-stars

Summary: This is Tolstoy, so it was meandering, but it also had the same wry sense of humor I appreciated in Anna Karenina.

For so long, I was having trouble devoting time to my blog because all my social media time was being sent on the Science March. So, of course, as soon as I finished working on the science march, I decided it was a good idea to pick up War and Peace! I’ve been wanting to read this for a long time and when Penguin offered to send me a beautiful, new printing they were doing, I couldn’t say no. Since the physical book is largely what distinguishes versions of classics, I will note that this is a really well-made copy. I particularly loved the ribbon bookmark for this enormous book! Read more »

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Review: Printer’s Error

May 12, 2017 Uncategorized 4

Review: Printer’s ErrorTitle: Printer's Error: Irreverent Stories from Book History
Author: Rebecca Romney, J. P. Romney
Links: Indiebound |Goodreads
Rating: four-stars

Summary: This was a fun, irreverent read with a lighter tone than most nonfiction, but still just as interesting and well researched.

“Since the Gutenberg Bible first went on sale in 1455, printing has been viewed as one of the highest achievements of human innovation. But the march of progress hasn’t been smooth; downright bizarre is more like it. Printer’s Error chronicles some of the strangest and most humorous episodes in the history of Western printing, and makes clear that we’ve succeeded despite ourselves. Rare-book expert Rebecca Romney and author J. P. Romney take us from monasteries and museums to auction houses and libraries to introduce curious episodes in the history of print that have had a profound impact on our world.” (Source) Read more »

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